DNA Project

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DNA Project

Postby Canadian Livingstone » Tue Feb 17, 2009 4:00 am

Hi Roberta, So the Malcolm Livingston in the 1871 Census at Port Hood near Judique is probably a son of pioneers John Livingston and Isabel McDonald who settled in the Judique area on the west coast of Cape Breton. And your ancestor John Livingston Jr. in the Low point/Lingan/Sydney vicinity was the son of pioneers John Livingston and Christy McPhee. At Boularderie and Howells Ferry area in the 1871 Census are two sons of pioneer Angus Livingston, Alexander and Archibald. Another Roderick has just died a few months previous in 1870. Cape George in Antigonish County, Nova Scotia has kin of pioneer Malcolm Livingston a brother of Angus Livingston. I still working on the Mabou/Mull River Livingston families and seeing whether they connect with the nearby Whycocomagh Livingstons or are connected with the Judique Livingstons. This is an appparent mystery that others have wondered about in the past and hopefully I can eventually solve this mystery. The Livingstons families east of Mabou were Presbyterians but I am sure if they connected to the Livingstons that lived at Mull River and at Mabou. If I can figure this one out it might unravel some of the mystery of the origins of Barry's possible Whycocomagh Livingston connection and what connections the whycocomagh Livingstons have with other Livingstons in the area if any. regards, Donald regards, Donald
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Postby Roberta Ann » Tue Feb 17, 2009 4:28 am

Donald, Catherine Livingstone, widow. Born PEI. died at Mull River 1912, Inverness County.
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Postby Canadian Livingstone » Tue Feb 17, 2009 10:31 pm

Hi Roberta, Thanks for that. Perhaps she is buried in a cemetery at Mull River. I am hoping that there is a way to get info on the Livingstons in that cemetery. The next obvious step is to contact the Whycocomagh Historical Society and the historian I have found in the Mabou area and see what they know about Whycocomagh Livingstons and Mull River/Mabou Livingstons. I am hoping to find out if the old Mull River Livingstons one of which was buried in the Mabou Cemetery in 1840 are of our Presbyterian branch or Roman Cathollic branch of the family. I dont know yet how long Barry's family were at Whycocomagh but there was apparently a Mull River Livingston family in the Mull River Mabou? area prior to 1840 according to information I have seen. There was a John and Mary Livingston living apparently in the Mull River/Mabou area before 1840 and John Livingston apparently died and was buried in Mabou Cemetery in 1840. I dont know at this point which branch of the family they are from or whether they were Catholic or Presbyterian. Many of the families at Mabou I understand were Roman Catholics but some were also apparently PResbyterian. Father west along the coast at Judique and Port Hood the Livingstons were Roman Catholic. Obviously some of the settlers at Mull River originated from Mull as did most of the Livingstons that settled at Cape Breton. While I using religious affiliation to identify the Livingston family branches in the 1800's, it is certainly is possible that they were all at one time from the same family group from Mull in earlier times. In fact quite possible. Like you have said, it it too bad that there is not more surviving information on the earlier history of the family on MUll. regards, Donald
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Postby Canadian Livingstone » Tue Feb 17, 2009 11:18 pm

Hi Roberta, The age is not the same as the widow Catharine I found in the census at Glen Coe but Glen Coe Mills is only about four mile or so from Mull River. One would suspect that the Glen Coe Livingstons I found are connected to the Mull River Livingstons. So I guess my question will be whether or not the Catharine you found is of the family that were at Glen Coe. I think I will focus on this Mull River Glen Coe area and see if I can locate and connect Presbyterian Livingstons there with Barry's apparent kin at Whycocomagh, Cape Breton one of which was buried at Lot 55,in Kings County PEi in 1868 where Barrys ancestor Angus settled with another family member John Livingston. I made notes of all the Livingstons I have found on Cape Breton Island in the 1871 Census for future reference. regards, Donald
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Postby Canadian Livingstone » Wed Feb 18, 2009 6:18 am

Hi Roberta, By the 1871 Census Catharine being 59 would be 99 or 100 in 1912 but close enough to 104. It is obviously the Catharine Livingston at Glencoe between Mabou and Whycocomaugh. I think her husband was John Livingstone but I am not certain. I am going to try to find out if she is buried in the Mull River area. regards, Donald
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Postby Canadian Livingstone » Thu Feb 19, 2009 5:51 am

Hi Roberta, I contacted a researcher who by the strangest coincidence is related to old Catharine Livingston. His family attended her funeral and went to her house at Mull River. He tells me that the Livingstones of Glen Coe actually lived in Mull River. Glen Coe is just the district or something like that. So the Glen Coe Livingstons I located are infact the Mull River Livingstons I have been looking for. I should be able to get a better sense of the history of this family soon. He has not found any connection between the Judique Livingstons and these Mull River Livingstons, although they both appear to be from Mull. He was wondering if John Livingston of Judique could have converted to his wife's religion. There is no way of knowing that I guess. I had not thought of that. It is possible more than one Livingston at Cape BReton could have converted to their wife's religion after they arrived at Cape Breton. regards, Donald
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Postby Roberta Ann » Sat Feb 21, 2009 12:45 am

Hi Donald; well as far as conversion goes I can tell you that our John Livingstone of Low Point married a definite Roman Catholic. I researched the McPhees in PEI and Cape Breton and I concluded that they were, mostly, Roman Catholic.
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Postby Canadian Livingstone » Sat Feb 21, 2009 1:51 am

Hi Roberta, Im Sorry about that. I have been working with Barry and Dr. St Clair and forgot about that. That is a terrific find and I started to go backwwards map by map but it could take a while to find a particular family. Barry found an 1863 map of Kings County PEI that includes the towns and families of that region. He has gone to the PEI archives and is going to check the deeds index and see if he can find out when his great grandfather Angus Livingston or Angus Livingstons father settled in Kings County PEI after leaving Nova Scotia possibly in the 1860's. I will mention your map to Barry. We really have know way of knowing what the scenario was regarding the religious aspect of our Livingstones. I have been trying to figure our if there were a group of Roman Catholic Livingstons on Mull circa 1800 but the information does not seem to be readily available in part because Mull does not seem to have Roman Catholic baptismal and marriage records before the mid 19th century I dont think. The conversion theory for one or both the Roman Catholic John Livingstons is possible given the fact that few of the Argyll Livingstons were Roman Catholic, but one cannot be 100% certain. Certainly the wifes family in both cases the McDonalds and McPhees are known to have been absolutely highland Roman Catholic, although even these families have a Roman Catholic and protestant branches I have noticed. And it sometimes happened that a Clan chief in the highlands would be one religion and his clan members another. ALso in the highlands clan meant more than ones religion and people of different religions generally got along better than elsewhere in the British Isles I understand in those times. regards, Donald
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