Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Canadian Livingstone » Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:32 pm

Hi Don,

Just a hunch but i suspect that Angus Livingston's son John named his son Charles Edward Livingston after Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie). Their Livingston family back in Western Argyll like most Maclea/Livingstons in Western Argyllshire likely supported the Prince's efforts in 1745-1746 to the restore the Stuart family on the throne and a number of Livingstons volunteered or were recruited into Appin Regiment commanded by Charles Stewart of Ardsheil of Appin, Argyllshire and served during the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion. A copy of original list of casualties of the Appin Regiment submitted to Charles Edward Stuart by one his secretaries in 1746 indicates a number of "Macleas" (Livingstones) that were killed or wounded during the Rebellion. If that is the case then it may be safe to assume that both John and his father like many other Livingtons connected to Western Argyllshire Livingstons likely looked upon Charles Edward Stuart with some respect and sympathy.

regards,

Donald
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Ansondon » Wed Mar 08, 2017 5:54 pm

Good info, Donald. Thank you.

- Don
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Canadian Livingstone » Sat Mar 11, 2017 2:37 pm

Hi Don,

While we don't have much in the way of information on the Argyllshire, Scotland origins of these North Carolina Livingston families I have been researching within the last 10 years, we do know they residing in their respective Counties in North Carolina by the late 1700's or early 1800 and some perhaps before that. This was part of the highland Argyllshire settlement of North Carolina of Scots that began way back in the 1730's when Argyllshire folks were first encouraged to settle in North Carolina and which continued into the 1770's and then continued in the years following the American Revolution.

I have also been researching an Argyll Scottish settlement which occurred around the same time in the 1730's when another group of Argyllshire Scots from Islay, Argyll arrived from 1738 to 1740 in then Province of New York where New York's own Argyll settlement of colonists was established.

regards,

Donald
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Ansondon » Sat Apr 29, 2017 7:23 pm

Donald,

I may have added a new member to your Parker Livingston cluster, based on the results of a 37 marker test, and consistent with the test results of the Tennessee Livingston who you mentioned to me. I thought you might be interested in knowing this.

Regards,

Don
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Canadian Livingstone » Sun Apr 30, 2017 1:26 pm

Hi Don,
Nice to hear from you again.
Yes great news indeed it was. I was quite surprised and delighted about that when I discovered we had kin to the Tennessee Livingston with North Carolina Highland Livingston roots. I greatly appreciate your efforts in this. Highland emigration of Argyllshire residents into Northern Carolina began back in the 1730's and continued in the 1770's with a break during he American Revolution and then continued thereafter in the early 1800's. Most of the Argyllshire Livingstons that settled in North Carolina however seem to have settled there in the late 1790's or early 1800's though there a a few families who may have settled there earlier in the 1700's. There is mention of some Livingstons settling in North Carolina the 1790's but not a lot of precise detailed info to work with. That is why the DNA testing is ideal as we can at least see if any of the three or four known Livingston families that settled in North Carolina in the 1700's or early 1800's are related or closely related and which ones are not. Some descendants from the old Richmond County, Anson County and Montgomery Livingston pioneer families are involved with familytreedna and their genealogy which is terrific. I have done some research on one other pioneer Livingston family in a neighbouring County Robeson County but we have been contacted by a descendant regarding genealogical inquiries and there is no Robeson County, NC. Livingston descendant in the familytreedna project as yet. But 3 out 4 of the original highland Livingston families that settled in that general area of North Carolina where many other highland Argyllshire Scottish families settled more than 200 years ago represented in the DNA project and in my own research project of Argyllshire Livingston settlement in North Carolina in the 1700's and early 1800's, is very encouraging. By the early 1800's many of the highland Argyllshire Livingstons were settling in Upper Canad and in particular in the other British North American colonies of Nova Scotia and neighbouring Prince Edward Island. I have done some extensive research of families in those areas which the help of a number of descendants of some of those pioneer Livingston families. My speciality is the original pioneer Livingston families who settled in Canada in the early 1800's but have a good working knowledge and experience with early Argyllshire Livingston settlers in America as well. I am know trying to learn more about the Livingstons who started settling in Australia beginning back in the 1830's 1840's and 1850's during that early period. I tend to focus just on the early pioneer settlers.

regards,

Donald
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Re: Duncan Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Alex L » Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:10 pm

Hello,

I am new to this message board and new to researching my ancestry. Through at visit to Anson County Historical Society and the ample knowledge you have shared in this forum, I have discovered more about my Livingstone ancestors than many of my immediate relatives have known. I''m not quite sure how to notate the lineage, but Duncan Livingstone is my great great great great grandfather. My grandfather always told my dad he grew up "down by the Pee Dee" and based on the land deed info below, he probably lived on or near this family land. Do you have any idea where these acres actually are? I've researched old maps it's just not clear to me. In a month or so when the weather stay consistently nice, my father and I are gonna go drive around the Lilesville township and get a sense of the area. We're also going to visit the gravesite where Angus M Livingstone and his wife Martha Covington Livingstone are buried.

I see that you all aren't really sure about old Angus' birthplace or whether he had brothers/siblings who settled in surrounding counties. Any developing information about these topics are of interest to me. I very much appreciate all the research you and anyone else have done!

Thanks!
Alex Livingstone


"Before there was a Duncan Livingston in Anson County, there was Angus. Neither Angus nor any other Livingston is shown in the 1790 federal census of Anson County. According to later census records, Angus was born about 1740, but I have found no record of him before 1798. (More about this below). On August 11, 1910, Mrs. Mary F. Lindsay dictated and signed an affidavit that gave her family history. Her grandmother, Mary Flake, and grandfather, John Smith, were early settlers on Smith’s creek. Of significance to the Livingston family history, Mary’s stated that John Smith had his home on the Stanback Ferry Road about 4 miles from Lilesville, North Carolina. Their land was on Smith’s Creek, Savannah Creek, and Cedar Creek. She stated that her grandfather, “John Smith, and old Mr. Livingstone, were the oldest settlers in this neighborhood that I ever heard of, and old Mr. Livingstone has been dead for over seventy years and my grandfather died before he died, but I don’t know how long before Mr. Livingstone died.”

A son, Duncan, was born to Angus in 1790. We know this date from Duncan’s obituary published 71 years later. A best guess is that Angus was about 50 years old when Duncan was born, and Duncan’s mother was no older than 32.

In 1798, Angus purchased 96 acres on Savannah Creek in North Carolina from Richard and Sarah Tallent adjoining the property of Thomas Tallent. In 1800, Angus is first shown in the census for Anson County. He is listed as 45 or older, making him born before 1755. Listed with him are a male between the age of 16-25 (born between 1775-1784), and a male under age 10 (born in or after 1790). Based on other census and land records, it likely that the older male is John Livingston, and the younger male is Duncan. Angus’ paternity of John and Duncan is stated in land transactions between them. Angus also had two females under age 10. I believe they are Angus’ daughters, Catherine and Mary, and one female age 26 to 42 (born between 1758 and 1774), who was Angus’ presumptive wife. She would have been born between 1758 and 1774.

In 1805, Angus purchased 60 acres of land on the Fall Branch of Smith’s Creek adjoining the property that Angus “now lives on.” This seems to confirm Angus as the “old Mr. Livingstone” mentioned in Mary Lindsay’s affidavit. In 1807, Angus Livingston purchased an additional 200 acres of land on the Fall Branch of Smith’s Creek.

In 1810 John purchased 150 acres of land on the Camp Branch of Savannah Creek. His brother, Duncan, witnessed the deed. I believe that a third son, Hugh Livingston, was born to Angus about this time. I don’t have a good fix on the date.

In 1813 and 1814 Duncan became a landowner too. He obtained a land grant of 100 acres of land adjacent to land owned by Angus.

In 1819, Angus gave by deed to “his son” Duncan an interest for Angus’s life in two parcels of land: one was 96 acres on Savannah Creek and the other 60 acres on Smith’s creek. It is this deed that conclusively establishes Duncan as the son of Angus.

I have not discovered the date of Duncan’s marriage to his wife Martha, or Martha’s surname. However records do show that on Christmas Day, 1821, Martha gave birth to Duncan’s first son, Angus M. Livingston. Three years later in 1824, a second son, John B. Livingston was born.

You give Martha "McCormick "as the name of Duncan’s wife. I can find no confirmation of the name “McCormick.”

Land records show that the middle name of Angus M. Livingston began “McK” or “MacK.” If this is correct, persons who list him in their family tree as Angus “McLean” are wrong.

*Angus Livingston
**John (1780-1847) either married to “Sarah” or “Sarah” was his daughter. She took a 1/3 share of his estate when John died in 1847.
***Charles Edward (1819-1884 (Tishoningo, Miss.) m. Elizabeth S. Harris
***Mary A. (1819-1884) m. Christopher Oliver Guion (Guin)
**Duncan (1790-1861) m. Martha W. (1798-1870)
***Angus MacK Livingston (1821-1885) m. Martha D. Covington (1824-1909)
***John B. (1826-1869) m. Adeline Fort (1829 – after 1889). About 1855, John B. moved the family to Wilcox County Alabama to the planation of Leon Ratcliff. They returned to Anson County either during or some time after the Civil War.
***James P. (1826-1902) m. Sallie Carson and m. Nancy Covington. Moved to Marengo, Alabama before the Civil War.
***Alexander L. (1828-1874) m. Mary Ann Boggan, and m. Louzette F. Hayes
***Eleanor (1828 - --) m. Eli P. Harrell
***Susan (1834-1888) m. John P. Vick
***Isaiah Coke (1840-1862) Died during Civil War
***Martha (1840---) m. Daniel McLauren
**Hugh (1810-1845) m. Thetis Allen
***Mary Ann (1833-1883) m. James L. Watkins
***Elizabeth (1834-1902) m. John Culpepper Smith and m. John Thomas Smith
***Roxanne (Catherine) (1836-1892) m. John Robinson Livingston
***Sarah Frances (1838-1893) m. John Alexander Avett

Best regards,[/quote]
Alex L
 
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Canadian Livingstone » Fri Feb 16, 2018 7:22 pm

Hi Alex,

I am glad to hear that you found Livingston genealogy info on this forum that pertains to your Anson County, North Carolina Livingston ancestors. I have been working over the years with Livingston ancestry from ANson County and neighbouring Richmond County and Montgomery County. As we have an ongoing Y DNA project with participants from Anson, Richmond and Montgomery Livingston family we have been able to determine that the Montgomery County Livingstons descended from James T. Livingston are not related at all to either the Anson or Richmond County Livingstons and that Angus Livingston of ANson County and Duncan Livingston of Richmond County, N.C. are related to the Western Argyll Livingstone family group but not closely related as in being brothers or second cousins. The only neighbouring pioneer North Carolina Livingston family group from the border area with South Carolina that we have not been contacted by or who not have participated in our DNA project over the last 10 years or so, is the Robeson County North Carolina Livington family descended from a Peter Livingston Sr. and his son Peter Livingston Jr. of Robeson County, North Carolina. I have hunch that this Peter Livingston Sr. born in the 1740's might be related to an old Duncan Livingston born in the 1740's or 1750's of Richmond County, North Carolina but only a DNA test can prove of disprove that. So far none of these old Livingston families that settled in Montgomery, Richmond, Anson and Robeson County are known to be closely related and so far the DNA testing of 3 out of 4 of them has proven this to be the case.


I don't know if you have put together a basic ancestral line list generation by generation i.e. grandfather, great grandfather, great-great grandfather, great-great-great grandfather etc. Livingston. connecting you to Duncan and his father Angus Livingston your oldest known Livingston ancestor.

If not then I can help. If you can provide me with the name of your great-grandfather, I can probably put together a basic Livingston ancestral line from that going back to Duncan and his father Angus Livingston of ANson County.

Duncan Livingston b. abt. 1790 in North Carolina d. June 11, 1861 Lilesville, ANson County, N.C. m. Martha (McCormick?) 1795-1876, March 26, 1821 in North Carolina ( note: wife could be Martha MCK?)
Lived at Sandy Point and Lilesville, Anson County, North Carolina
Are you descended from Duncan's son Angus b. 1821 and if so do you know which son of listed below is your ancestor. Do you know the name of your great-great-great grandfather, great-great grandfather or great-grandfather? It would be helpful to have information so I can figure out precisely how you are related to these Anson County Livingston pioneer settlers.

1. Angus Livingston b. December 25, 1821 d. Sept. 3, 1885 Anson County, NC. m. Martha Covington Sept 6, 1843 Wadesboro, Anson County, N.C.
2. [b]John B. Livingston 1824-1870

3. James P. Livingston 1826 - June 19, 1902 Alabama
4. Eleanor Livingston b. 1828
5. Martha Livingston b. 1833
6. Susan Livingston b. Nov. 14, 1834 m. John Vick
7. Isaiah Coke 1840-1862[/b]

I have been in touch over the years firstly with two descendants of John Livingston son of Angus Livingston of Robeson County and more recently with a possible cousin of yours, Donald R. Livington who you can gather from these posts here like you a descendant of Angus Livingstons other son Duncan. Donald R. has done quite a bit of research and knows much more that me about early genealogy and history of your Robeson County ancestors than I. Donald R. I believe may be related to you. I think Donald R. will be able to better answer some of your question regarding location. I will try and let him know that you have some questions about the Anson County Livingstons. He seems to be very well informed on the Anson County Livingstons.

regards,

Donald (Livingstone) Clink
Historian
Clan Maclea Livingstone Society
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Ansondon » Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:38 pm

Donald and Alex,

I believe that I can generally pin point the Livingston property for Alex. I will need to review copies of deeds and maps, but I feel certain that I can provide some direction. Please give me a week or two to pull it together.

Alex, what is your connection to Duncan? Which of Duncan's children was your ancestor? Best regards, - Don
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby Alex L » Sat Feb 24, 2018 7:59 pm

Donald and Don,

Thank you so much for the responses. Based on the notation I've seen I'll make my connection with Angus as simple as possible:

*Angus Livingstone
**Duncan
***Angus M.
****John T
*****William A
******William A Jr
******* William A III (me)

I was at the Genealogy Library at the State Archives yesterday and found information that almost confused me more than helped. But it seems that I really don't need to do too much research in order to find my connection to Scotland.

Regarding Anson County and location(s) of Livingstone settlements, I look forward to what you come up with, Don. For my own interest and records, I'm going to order a few map reproductions to get a better idea of the area and how it's evolved. I've already seen on an old map that Grassy Island Rd. used to be in a different place and what is now Grassy Island Rd used to be called River Rd. Based on the Land Deed records, if I didn't know this I'd be looking in the wrong place for location clues. Anyway, that it has been narrowed down to Lilesville Tp is encouraging enough. As far as my dad and I visiting my great-great grandparents' graves and surveying the countryside, it'll be late April before we can get over there.

Don, might we be related?

Thank you very much, guys. Cheers,

Alex L.
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Re: Angus Livingston Anson County, North Carolina

Postby johnbuchan » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:05 pm

Here is a coincidence. I am a descendant of a Morvern, Argyllshire Scotland Livingston family that emigrated in 1851 from Morvern to Ohio, USA. There are a least of couple of Angus Livingstons in my Scotland Argyllshire ancestry.
My wife is a descendant of a Martha Wall Covington (1819-1870) of Rockingham, North Carolina. Now in this forum I find a thread of posts about an Angus Livingstone of Argyllshire married to a Martha Covington of Anson County, North Carolina which is just a few miles from Rockingham, NC. So, maybe my wife and I are cousins!
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